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Greensboro Workers' Compensation Law Blog

Man pinned in lift accident suffered injuries

  • 10
  • February
    2016

Workplace accidents, in most cases, can be prevented with stringent rules on safety and steps to make sure everyone working knows what to do if hazards are seen. When workplaces are educated in safety techniques, it's less likely for workers to be injured. If you're hurt due to the carelessness of a coworker or as a result of malfunctioning machinery, you could be in a position to obtain workers' compensation, because getting hurt on the job shouldn't happen.

A Port of Wilmington employee who was hurt during an accident is now part of an investigation by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, since he was pinned in an odd lift accident. The news, updated on Feb. 7, reports that the man had been working with others who were using a lift to replace the lighting fixtures inside a building. He had been inside the lift basket, based on the story, which makes what happened next surprising.

North Carolina businesses face fines for lack of insurance

  • 03
  • February
    2016

When you work for an employer, that employer should always have workers' compensation insurance. Even if you're not in a dangerous profession, it's possible to have an accident at work. Slick floors on a wet day, climbing a ladder that collapses, or even getting a shock from an outlet can result in injuries in the course of your workday. If you get hurt and find out that your boss doesn't have compensation, then you may have to work through other avenues with your attorney to get the money you need.

A report out of North Carolina has shown that many companies in the state have been fined, because it's been discovered that they don't, or didn't, carry workers' compensation insurance. $1 million in civil fines have been collected by the commission responsible for enforcing insurance coverage.

Staying safe at work: Tips for being a safe employee

  • 27
  • January
    2016

As an individual in the workforce, being safe is a priority. Not all jobs are safe by nature; construction jobs require you to work with major equipment, sharp and heavy objects and other dangerous items. Even office jobs have times when an employee may be working on a ladder and have a risk of falling or could be working with scissors or sharp objects capable of puncturing an individual who falls, trips or is otherwise allowed to come into contact with the blade.

To stay safe at work, it's important to make sure you're properly trained. If your employer isn't willing to train you, then you may want to seek out advice from your attorney or your human resources department. It's your employer's job to manage the risks to his employees, and that means giving you proper training.

Work-related injuries in the United States: The statistics

  • 21
  • January
    2016

Nonfatal work-related injuries and illnesses impact thousands of Americans every year. In 2012, 155 million workers were part of the U.S. civilian labor force. Each of these people could be at risk of work-related injuries or illnesses, depending on their jobs and activities.

If you've been hurt at work, you are already part of this statistic, but you shouldn't be treated like one. You deserve to be compensated for your injuries and illnesses, because your job is what caused them. Whether you simply need a day of medical care and rest or you're left with a disability, that's what workers' compensation is there for.

Firefighting facts: Illnesses and injuries on the job

  • 11
  • January
    2016

Fighting fires is a very dangerous job, and the men and women who work in the field are courageous people who save lives and homes every day. Firefighting is not without risk, and many of these people are hurt every year in the line of duty. As of July 2013, an average of 31 firefighters had been killed on the job in each of the four previous years. Another 14,700 had suffered work-related injuries and illnesses.

In 2011, 28 firefighters were fatally injured on the job. This was a decrease in the number of firefighters killed per year when you see that there had been 29 percent more deaths in 2003, but the number is still too high. Safe equipment can help, but the unpredictability of a building on fire still makes the job dangerous.

Illnesses in the workplace: You can be compensated

  • 07
  • January
    2016

When you work in any industry, it's possible to suffer from occupational illnesses. These illnesses may appear gradually or suddenly over the course of many years. For instance, logging workers may suffer wear and tear on the joints, leading to repetitive strain injuries.

Workers who come into contact with asbestos may suffer from mesothelioma or other lung-related disorders. In most cases, these illnesses can be prevented by either avoiding the harmful chemicals that workers were exposed to or by limiting the time a worker is operating machinery or actively working in the field.

What determines if an injury or illness is work-related?

  • 31
  • December
    2015

Is your illness a direct result of your work? How can you be sure? Does it matter as long as the illness presents itself while you're on the job?

When you're trying to determine if an injury or illness is related to your job, it's important to look at all factors of your work. For example, if you're exposed to chemicals in your 30s, it could take until your 50s before any side effects or illnesses result. You also need to link your work environment to that injury.

What is traumatic incident stress?

  • 24
  • December
    2015

When you're at work, there are several kinds of injuries you can suffer from. You often hear about traumatic injuries that are physical in nature, but there are also psychological wounds that can make it difficult for you to work effectively. When you suffer from traumatic incident stress, you should be able to get the same kinds of workers' compensation as when you're physically hurt.

Often, it's those who respond to emergencies who suffer from this kind of stress. People like first responders who encounter victims of terrible fires, earthquakes or explosions see first hand the terror and anguish of those situations. It's enough to leave a mark on anyone, and for some, traumatic stress is a result.

Teen pulled into wood chipper dies, owner has heart attack

  • 16
  • December
    2015

Working with heavy machinery is very dangerous for construction teams, and new workers have to be fully informed of those dangers. If you work with machines that chop, blend or shred, then it's important to know how to turn it off, reverse the blades and top jams safely. If you're hurt because safety regulations aren't followed, then your attorney may advise you to seek compensation from your workplace.

A story out of North Carolina draws attention to the dangers of working in construction. According to the news release from Dec. 9, a teenager had just started his first day of work when he was pulled into a wood chipper and killed.

Types of chemicals that can cause workplace injuries

  • 10
  • December
    2015

Chemicals are used often in manufacturing and other such industries, and exposure to them can be very dangerous to employees. Often, short-term exposure isn't a big issue, but employees who are exposed to these chemicals five or more days a week for years on end could develop serious diseases. Some of the most dangerous substances and chemicals include the following:

-- Mercury -- Brass -- Arsenic -- Anthrax -- Zinc -- Manganese -- Phosphorus -- Lead -- Chrome -- Benzol -- Carbon Bisulphide -- Menthanol -- Radium

Jay Gervasi, P.A.
910 North Elm Street
Greensboro, NC 27401
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