Employers in North Carolina should make sure that their electrical systems are working properly. If not, employees could incur catastrophic injuries, some of which could be fatal. A lack of proper grounding or bonding systems could also result in downtime concerns that could put companies at a competitive disadvantage. If the downtime occurs in a 911 call center or other emergency facility, it could put the entire community at risk. To prevent this from happening, it is important to comply with the National Electrical Code.

Ideally, businesses and emergency centers will go above and beyond those requirements. This is because it is not always the best or easiest system to employ. Therefore, it should be seen as a starting point to keep electrical damage to a minimum. It is similar to how meeting OHSA safety requirements should be a starting point as opposed to an end goal. In many cases, upgrades are relatively affordable, and they can save money in the long run as well. For example, some buildings can be made safer simply by changing out existing wires for new ones.

Adding or rearranging branch circuits can also reduce the chances of an electrical issue occurring. One company that was losing $1 million per year in electrical damage spent $500,000 to make necessary changes. After appropriate changes were made, there were significantly fewer issues with equipment damage.

People who are injured on the job often need extensive medical care and treatment. Most employers are required to carry workers’ compensation insurance, and injured victims might want to have legal assistance when filing a claim for benefits that could include the payment of those medical bills.