Workplace illnesses can include mental health concerns that may be attributed to the workplace and your work environment. For instance, a traumatic event in the workplace could result in post-traumatic stress disorder, depression or ongoing anxiety. Harassment can cause concerns and also affect your mental health. Of course, many other things can as well.

Depression costs around $200 million in lost workdays each year, and that results in losses of around $17 to $44 billion. The rates of depression do vary by occupation and industry, with workers age 55 or older reporting that they have some kind of mental health concern at a rate of around 20 percent.

Workers who suffer from depression can miss work often. According to the statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, workers with depression miss an average of 4.8 days of work in three months, while they also suffer around 11.5 days of reduced productivity.

Depression varies by occupation, and perhaps unsurprisingly, it’s most common among those in the personal care and service occupations at a rate of 10.8 percent. Those in food preparation and serving also suffer often and at a rate of 10.3 percent.

Depression increases health care costs and can lead to or contribute to other health concerns as well. If you’re suffering from depression due to your work environment, you may be able to seek workers’ compensation to help you cover the costs of the appropriate treatments. Our website has more information on depression and mental and physical health in the workplace, so you can learn how to make a claim.